Tagged: Electrical

OSHA 30 in Omaha

The OSHA 30 Training Program provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces. The program also provides information regarding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint.

The OSHA 30 Training Program employees attend 30 hours of classes delivered by Jeff Bennett, Thompson Electric’s OSHA authorized trainer.  The 30 hour class is intended for employees with responsibility for safety in the field or as a refresher class for their personal well-being. The past 2 months Jeff Bennett provided OSHA 30 training for 16 employees from our Omaha office.  This was the fourth OSHA 30 Training class in the past couple years in Omaha.

The 16 employees that attended the OSHA 30 Training were Charles Ball, George Turner, Mick Coffman, Daniel Erdbruger, Bret Falk, Nick Guthrie, Dave Hibler, Lynn Kahnk, Brad Madej, James Mahr, Nick Vincent, Aaron Miller, Chris Saab, Doug Stephens, Dan VanGrud and Richard Roan.

We are proud of the commitment made to achieve the OSHA 30 Certification and recognize those who attended with an OSHA 30 Safety Vest.

Congratulations to all…

National Electrical Code (NEC) 2017

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Throughout the United States and around the world, NFPA 70®: National Electrical Code® (NEC) sets the foundation for electrical safety in residential, commercial, and industrial occupancies. The 2017 edition of this trusted Code presents the latest comprehensive regulations for electrical wiring, overcurrent protection, grounding, and installation of equipment.

NFPA 70: NEC has been published since 1897, and a rigorous process of review keeps it up-to-date with new technologies. In fact, more than 4,000 public inputs and 1,500 comments went into the 2017 NEC alone. Hundreds of updates and five all-new articles pave the way to a safe and efficient electrical future.  Every 3 years the NFPA releases an updated version of the NEC.

How do our licensed electricians stay abreast of these changes?  They are required, as part of maintaining their electrical license, to have 6 hours of training per year (that’s Iowa, NE and SD are similar) that includes reviewing the new code changes.  This is a never ending process for the licensed electricians, as the NEC comes out with a new addition every 3 years.

United Way Kick-off

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This past Monday, the United Way Kick-off luncheon was held at Thompson Electric in Sioux City.  Heather Hennings from the United Way and Cathy Grimsley, a Red Cross board member, spoke about how the money is used and distributed in Siouxland.  The money that is donated to the United Way stays in the Siouxland area and is distributed to local charities that have the most urgent needs.

This is a great way to help our communities and Thompson Electric, Thompson Specialty Services, Electric Innovations and TEC Corp and our employees are proud to a part of such a worthy cause.

OSHA 30 in Omaha…

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The OSHA 30 Training Program provides training for workers and employers on the recognition, avoidance, abatement, and prevention of safety and health hazards in workplaces. The program also provides information regarding workers’ rights, employer responsibilities, and how to file a complaint. This is a voluntary program and attended on their own time.

The OSHA 30 Training Program employees attend 30 hours of classes delivered by Jeff Bennett, Thompson Electric’s authorized trainer.  The 30 hour class is intended for employees with responsibility for safety in the field or as a refresher class for their personal well-being.

The past 3 weekends Jeff Bennett provided OSHA 30 training for 19 employees from our Omaha office.  This was the second OSHA 30 Training class in the past year in Omaha and this class was asked for by a group of our employees.  We think it’s great when a group of employees ask for Safety Training.

The 19 employees that attended the OSHA 30 Training were Joe Perchal, Kevin Dawson, Russ Armstrong, Garrett Taub, Chris Estelle, Austin Taylor, Riley Fischer, Ryan Gilbert, Tom Plambeck, John McCaul, John Hilt, Charlie Wenck, Dwayne Goodman, Dean McCarthy, Bill O’Shea, Christian Thomas, Chris Osborn, Corey Osborn and Steve Tebben.

We are proud of the commitment made to achieve the OSHA 30 Certification and recognize those who attended with an OSHA 30 Hooded Sweatshirt.

Congratulations to all…

Busy time at Thompson Electric…

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It’s been a very busy time at Thompson Electric this summer.  There have been a lot of new hires, new offices and new business units for Thompson Electric.

First, we have hired a lot of very talented people to fill some existing positions and also for new positions.  The new positions are Human Resources – TEC Corp, General Manager – Thompson Specialty Services, Office Administrator – Thompson Specialty Services, Administrator Coordinator – Thompson Electric in Sioux City and a new Assistant Service Manager in Sioux Falls and Omaha.

Thompson Electric in Omaha moved into their new office location over Memorial Day and are still getting settled in, while Thompson Electric in Sioux Falls has purchased a new building with the anticipation of moving sometime in September.

Also, we officially started Thompson Specialty Services as its own business unit.  TSS will service and develop new business with arc flash, infrared thermal imaging, preventive maintenance, solar energy and many other opportunities that are being worked on and developed.

Finally, all three offices are extremely busy with work.  So, you can see it has been a busy summer at Thompson Electric and looking ahead, the future looks just as busy.

GEAPS…What is it?

TSS Agriculture_SM

In the first part of June, Jason Glover and Kent Grange attended the GEAPS (Grain Elevator and Processing Society) conference in Ames, IA.  The GEAPS event was an opportunity to showcase Thompson Specialty Services and the services we provide.

There were many Co-op and Elevator Groups represented at this conference.  It was well attended and that gave TSS an opportunity to speak with many General Managers, Operation Managers and Safety Managers from different regions in IA, NE, KS and MO.  We showcased our Infrared Thermal Imaging, Arc Flash Risk Assessment and Preventive Maintenance programs.

Why did we attend this conference?   GEAPS’ Mission: “An international professional society dedicated to providing its members with forums to generate leadership, innovation and excellence in grain-related industry operations.”  By becoming a member into GEAPS, this provides an opportunity for Thompson Specialty Services to expand into a market area that is being underserved.  We look forward to continuing and expanding our many services to the Grain Industry.

In August, we will be attending the NGFA (National Grain and Feed Association)/GJ (Grain Journal) Safety Grain Quality Conference in Omaha.

Raising Awareness About Electric Shock Drowning:

ELectrical Drowining

This article is a reminder that there is electrical danger everywhere, even where we probably least expect it, when we are swimming.  Be aware, this can happen, so be safe and check your wiring over water, annually.

Conscientious parents, who would never imagine letting their children go boating without a life vest or ride in a car without securing their seat belts, often have no qualms about letting a child jump off a dock into fresh water. What these parents don’t realize is that if the dock has 120-volt AC power, lethal amounts of electricity could be finding their way into the water from faulty wiring on the dock or a boat. In a one-week period this past July, four children and one young adult were killed in separate electric shock drowning (ESD) incidents at docks on freshwater lakes.

At a marina on Cherokee Lake in Tennessee, a 10-year-old boy died instantly and his 11-year-old friend was critically injured and died the following day after swimming near a docked houseboat. Frayed wiring near a metal swim ladder on the houseboat was believed to have been the cause. Five adults who tried to rescue the boys were also affected and there likely would have been more fatalities had someone on the dock not had the presence of mind to disconnect the houseboat’s shore power cord.

At Dry Branch Cove on Lake of the Ozarks, a 26-year-old woman was electrocuted and died while swimming from a private dock that, according to preliminary police reports, had faulty wiring. Her two half-brothers, ages 11 and 13, felt a tingling and were saved when they swam toward a different dock.

In a separate Lake of the Ozarks incident, an 8-year-old boy and his 13-year-old sister both died while swimming from a dock that was also reported to have “improper wiring.”

Photo of eight-year-old Brayden Anderson Eight-year-old Brayden Anderson was electrocuted on the Fourth of July while swimming from a dock at Lake of the Ozarks. His 13-year old sister Alexandra was also an ESD victim.

An earlier test of 50 freshwater boats in the Portland, Oregon area by Kevin Ritz, the nation’s foremost expert on ESD, found that 13 boats — 26 percent — were leaking potentially lethal doses of electricity into the water. How much electricity is lethal? AC current flow of around 100 milliamps (mA) of AC current will put the heart into fibrillation and death will likely follow within seconds. But lesser amounts of electricity, say, 15- 30 mA, will create muscle paralysis, and even the best swimmers will be drowned. Note that most local law enforcement investigators don’t have the technical background to recognize an ESD accident and there is no post-mortem evidence available to coroners to ascertain whether electricity was involved in a drowning. It is highly likely that there are many “drowning” victims who were actually electrocuted.

When ESD accidents are identified, the parents and friends of the victims are almost always unaware that swimming from an energized dock is dangerous. In many past ESD cases, bystanders who dove into the water to save children have also become victims.

To protect against ESD accidents, the American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) adopted standards in 2010 that require an Equipment Leakage Circuit Interrupter (ELCI) be installed on new boats. However, not all boat manufacturers follow the ABYC standards, which are voluntary, and there is no requirement to retrofit ELCIs on older boats. There is also no standard that requires the installation of Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) at marinas and private docks. (Note that in Europe, GFCIs have been required at marinas for almost 30 years and ESD is no longer a concern.) Until such time as freshwater boats and docks are safe — and that could be decades away — the best defense is to never swim near docks with energized 120-volt AC power. Signs should be posted warning children and parents to STAY OUT OF THE WATER! The rule has to be enforced. If someone must go into the water to retrieve something lost overboard, the electricity to the dock should be shut off.

Little girl jumping off dock Parents who would never consider allowing their child to go swimming without a life vest will often have no qualms letting a child jump off an energized dock into fresh water.

Note that 12-volt electricity will not cause ESD. Nor will 120-volt current from a boat’s generator unless another boat (with an electrical fault) is sharing electricity from the generator via a power cord. In saltwater, electricity does not cause ESD; saltwater is more conductive than the human body. There is not yet enough research to know at what point brackish water becomes dangerous or what distance from a possible electrical fault is safe. When in doubt, stay out.

Note: You can test to see if a boat is leaking electrical current using something called an AC clamp meter, which clamps onto a shore power cord and measures electricity going into the boat’s electrical system and returning from the system. If the two numbers aren’t exactly the same, electricity is in the water. Clamp meters, GFCIs and ELCIs are available at West Marine, (www.westmarine.com). If you have questions about your dock or boat’s electrical system, your best source is an ABYC-certified marine electrician.

 

By Bob Adriance

Published in BoatUS